THE MODERN DAY WORKFORCE – DR ROSELYN BORG KNIGHT

With over a decade of experience under her belt and a dual-qualification in Law, Dr. Roselyn Borg Knight has definitely gained the insight and knowledge she needs to provide fantastic services to her clientele. After being involved in a number of organisations and lobby groups over the years, she thinks it’s now time to give something back to the Maltese community, and is a candidate for the next election on the PN ticket.

As we comfortably sit down and sip on some breakfast drinks, Roselyn expresses how passionate she is about her job as an employment lawyer and trainer. Although she claims to have gotten into this sector of work purely by coincidence after landing her first job at the Malta Employers Association, she claims that she still “absolutely love[s] it” and that it “fit[s] her like a glove”.

 

After commencing her career in Malta, the high-spirited lawyer then decided to “widen [her] horizons” by moving to the U.K. to work as a solicitor. Originally, she planned to stay there for a year, but her increased passion for her job whilst in England and the blossoming of a new relationship with her future husband, Crispian Knight, led her to remain in the UK for about eight years. After many years abroad, she then returned to Malta to be at the side of her ill father and settled back into the island life.

Despite having to jump over a few hurdles in her personal life, Dr. Borg Knight, who calls herself “self-made”, drove straight into entrepreneurship and decided to set up her own firm, Twenty One Law, in 2012, after having already set up Borg Knight Solicitors in the UK. Nowadays, the vivacious woman continues to specialise in employment law often tackling problems such as redundancies, unfair dismissal and many more.

As we converse, Roselyn explains that her experience as an employment lawyer, both in Malta and the U.K., has led her to meet many people from all walks of life, causing her to recognise the need to “empower people to work”. So, other than providing services as a lawyer, she also set up a great training service in order to educate employers and employees on law and HR, as well as the use of social media at the workplace. Moreover, Dr.Borg Knight has also dedicated herself to providing an online service to the public. She’s not only successfully managed to leave her digital footprint on the internet by starting up her own blog, but has also started a Facebook page called Work Matters 4 U, in order to encourage engagement about work-related topics, provide crucial information about the legal infrastructure of the working world, and reach out to the community as a whole.

According to Dr.Borg Knight, working life presents individuals with their own difficulties in maintaining a great work-life balance. This of course not only applies to people who are married with children, but also to individuals who are single. When asked if it’s something she struggles with herself, the hard-working lawyer and mother to a 2-year old son confessed that it’s a challenge and that she does struggle presently to this day, especially since she’s been self-employed for a number of years. Like many men and women out there she says, “sacrifices have to be made” in order to be successful.

 

Instilled with positive-thinking, Dr. Borg Knight envisions the future for many individuals as bright. Roselyn said that whilst “the situation in Malta has improved”, we must “not slack behind” the rest of Europe in terms of improving laws. Thus, we must continue to look at policies and laws in order to address inequalities at the workplace to continue to improve the situation of many men and women who form part of the Maltese workforce.

Before we leave the cafe, I ask her one brief but imminent question, “What is success?”  To this she smiles and responds, “Success is different for everybody. It’s engaging in an activity that you’ve got the drive to do.” The smiling lawyer then says, “Not everybody wants to be a millionaire; some people just want to make a living. And that’s fine too.”

 

This interview was kindly provided by Francesca Grixti Soler.