HOW TO DEAL WITH RACISTS

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Lo and behold! The Aryans are here to tell us how much better than ‘the others’ we actually are.

This tends to make our blood boil, but there are better ways to deal with them.

There are very few things in life that I can’t stand; people who get into discussions with no inclination to learn something new or to try to see things from the other person’s perspective is one of them. Then there are cockroaches, and racists.

To hell with all three of you.

But if, like me, the latter get your goat beyond belief, then fret not. There are actual ways to outsmart racists. After all, someone with that big an ego surely can’t be that smart.

Stay calm – I’ve already broken this point, as you can see above. I’m sorry. But seriously, remain calm in the face of racism… unless it’s turned violent, in which case run away or help out. However, you must remember that nothing bothers a racist more than seeing someone of their own skin colour looking down on them and acting cautiously. It drives them wild with anger.

React towards the issue – Don’t make this about John the butcher, but keep it about the situation. Don’t tell a racist he or she is racist, because it will just make them angrier. You’ll also have to deal with them ranting on about how they’re not racists. So, instead, focus on the behaviour or what they said, and explain why it’s not correct.

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Become an ally – Racism is still very much part of our daily lives, and we must actively oppose it if we ever hope to bring it to an end. So become an ally and stand up for others, and express your displeasure when people say or do things that are racist.

Do it as a group – Racism isn’t always fully overt or intentional. In fact, most people who experience racism go through what are called micro-aggressions – automatic reactions by people who may not necessarily want to be hurtful. These include asking people things like, ‘Where are you originally from?’ – because there’s no way someone black can be from anywhere other than Botswana – or, ‘Can I touch your hair?’, which is just downright cheeky. When these things happen, it’s often difficult for the person to understand what is racist about their comment or action, so talk to the person as a group. There’s strength in numbers.

Of course, if by the end of it, the racist continues in his ways, feel free to be rude back.

 

Do you have any other words of advice on how to deal with racists?

Let us know in the comment section below.

 

 

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