WOULD YOU ADMIT TO PLASTIC SURGERY?

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Perhaps you’d like to have leaner arms. How about a straighter nose? Would you opt for a more defined jaw line? Maybe squats aren’t doing enough to tone your thighs.

Fear not. All this can be sorted out by a certified plastic surgeon. From cankle reductions to tummy tucks to butt implants, most imperfections can be seen to by science. Personal hang-ups and insecurities can be carved and snipped away by a team of highly professional surgeons in a matter of hours.

As more time passes, the more common it has become for a good number of men and women to go under the knife, as it is no longer a luxury reserved solely for the rich and famous. It is in fact this group of people who have propelled the cosmetic industry into the financial band of the middle and lower classes. The media displays the groomed and polished looks of celebrities, secretly advertising the workmanship of many a plastic surgeon. And the more we are exposed to their work, the more we become inclined to have a few corporeal adjustments to achieve aesthetic precision.

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There is absolutely nothing wrong in having work done. We are in control of our own bodies and we have the right to choose to make alterations through our own consent, and no one else’s pressure. Many people who have had corrective surgery can vouch for their restored self-esteem, especially if they’ve lived with an imperfection that has had a negative impact on them for a long time. Nothing can describe the tears of joy and relief when first seeing the much awaited results of surgery. You feel as if you owe your life to your surgeon, because they have indeed, quite literally, changed it for the better. They do not just alter undesired features – they relieve you of mental burdens.

Yet, it’s surprising how one finds quite a few who refuse to admit to having had surgery done. They don’t really voice it in public, or they deny it to anyone who asks, and they have every right to do so, of course. They are entitled to their discretion, especially in today’s world where privacy is very hard to get hold of. And this is probably why most celebrities do not publicise their surgical interventions – it’s one of the few things they get to keep to themselves.

However, it won’t stop their audience from questioning and noticing certain changes that happen. It’s not just attuned eyes which can detect enhanced cleavage and raised bottoms. We can very easily notice the physical evolution of celebrities through paparazzi photos. If you pick a star and look through photos of when they had just started out, and compare them to their contemporary images, it’s very easy to point out the noses that have been slimmed down, the chins that have been lengthened and the breasts that have been reduced. If we take Angelina Jolie, for example, it’s quite hard to deny that some changes have been made.

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The pointing out of this is in no way a criticism towards her work or her appearance. It is merely observation and nothing more. Her nose at 40 is much less bulbous and thick than the nose she had at 20. It is now straighter and has a more rectangular tip. The question we must ask ourselves however, is whether she was requested by her people to alter the shape to keep up with Hollywood standards, or whether it was her decision and hers alone. This is, of course, a private matter, and we’ll probably never get to find out. But it would be quite disappointing if one of the most beautiful and intelligent women in the film industry had been bullied into enhancing her already highly attractive features, just to further contribute to the marketing of the unattainable. Aside from the removal of her ovaries and her mastectomy, she has never spoken about any other operations.

In contrast to this, actors such as Sofia Vergara and Sophia Loren have been open about their assertiveness towards ‘suggestions’ made by the industry. Loren had threatened to return to Italy when she was criticised by Hollywood executives for having a nose which was, apparently, too large for the camera. Budge she did not, and went on to become one of the sexiest women in the world, Roman nose and all. It is of course, debatable as to what she’s had done in recent years, but it would be good to believe that her choices were made on her own accord and no one else’s. I very much doubt the public will condemn the 80 year old for having botox and the odd lift. Vergara had also decided against having a breast reduction, which, according to her PR, would have increased her casting range. Her recent consideration of a reduction or a mastopexy, which was quite vocal, seems to be genuine in that it will be her personal choice.

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The great thing about these two examples is that they have been open about surgery and the allowance for public figures to have imperfections. Vergara often jokes about her sagging breasts – her sense of humour is what makes her both sexy and endearing. Their openness is a breath of fresh air, a reminder that most of what we’re coaxed into trying to look like ultimately involves scalpels, silicone and a truckload of cellulite cream. None of it is natural, which is fine, so long as we are given the social freedom to admit to it and not be condemned for doing so. It’s as if society is pressuring us into having our imperfections changed, but by the way, don’t tell anyone about it and treat your former feature as if it were an unspeakable truth.

So if you’ve had anything done, don’t worry. Shout it out and be proud of it… and by the way, you look absolutely fabulous, darling.

 

Would you admit to having had cosmetic surgery?

Let us know in the comment section below.